Thesis Research

Preservice Agriculture Teachers Development of Knowledge of Content and Students During their Student Teaching Experience

Authors

AJ Argueta

Five pre-service teachers were analyzed to determine how they adjusted their content based on the knowledge of their students, a concept described as knowledge of content and students (KCS). The teachers all taught the same unit (plant parts and functions) and were analyzed through their lesson plans, a pre-interview before teaching the unit, a post-interview after the unit and one lesson observation within the unit. The findings were then coded by the researcher using a pedagogical content knowledge framework and revealed six major themes about the development of a pre-service knowledge of content and students. [Graduate Student]

Additional Information

Date of publication:
2018

Wild greens knowledge and consumption: a qualitative exploration of human agency in the Southern Arizona food system

Authors

Teresa De Koker
Matthew M. Mars
Robert Torres
Tanya M. Quist

This qualitative, single case study explores the influence of the dominant food system (DFS) on the knowledge and consumption of three wild greens (amaranth, lambquarters, purslane) by 24 Latinxs living in Tucson, Arizona (AZ), USA. The three greens are each considered to be traditional Latinx foods. In addition to the natural occurrence of the wild greens, Tucson was selected as the study site due to its rich and diverse food tradition and deep agricultural history. A pattern of decline in the knowledge and consumption of the wild greens is observed according to three overlapping themes: generational awareness, consumer demand and scarcity, and accessibility. The bureaucratic controls that bring calculability, efficiency, and predictability to the DFS are found to be influential in the decline in wild green knowledge and consumption by the study participants. The downward knowledge and consumption pattern is further considered in the context of participant agency within the DFS. Implications for practice include strategies for more purposefully leveraging community settings and alternative marketplaces to revitalize the knowledge and consumption of wild greens and other traditional foods. Recommendations are also provided for future research on the effects of rationalization within the DFS on human agency and traditional food consumption. [Graduate Student] Teresa De Koker, Matthew M. Mars, Robert M. Torres & Tanya M. Quist (2018) Wild greens knowledge and consumption: a qualitative exploration of human agency in the Southern Arizona food system, Food, Culture & Society, 21:3, 331-349, DOI: 10.1080/15528014.2018.1451040

Additional Information

Date of publication:
2018

Research Categories

Examining the entrepreneurial leadership proclivities of Extension educators

Authors

Ashley Jeffers-Sample
Matthew M. Mars
Amber H. Rice
Robert M. Torres

Jeffers-Sample, A., Mars, M. M., Rice, A. H., & Torres, R. M. (in press). Examining the entrepreneurial leadership proclivities of Extension educators. Journal of Extension. [Graduate Student]

Date of publication:
2018

Touristic Authenticity and Value Co-Creation: An Exploration of Two Local Wineries in Southeastern Arizona, USA

Authors

Sonora Cubillas
Matthew M Mars
Robert M Torres
Patricia M Sias

Local wineries typically generate revenues and increase product exposure through touristic activities and strategies. Moreover, tourism represents an opportunity for local wineries to purposefully engage customers in the co-creation of products and services, which in turn promotes greater customer loyalty (Hollebeek & Brodie 2009). In this paper, we explore the intersection of touristic authenticity (Cohen, 1988; Wang, 1999) and value co-creation (Prahalad & Ramaswamy, 2004a,b) at two local wineries located in the Sonoita-Elgin Wine Region of Southeastern Arizona, USA. Our findings indicate that touristic authenticity is enhanced through the application of the four core principles of value co-creation —dialogue, accessibility, risk assessment, transparency. Based on the findings, a value co-creation guide is proposed as a practical tool to be used by local wineries to empower tourists as value co-creators. Equally important, potential spillover effects of such empowerment on the rural communities and economies in which local wineries exist are considered [Graduate Student]

Additional Information

Date of publication:
2017

Research Categories

Who am I versus who can I become? Exploring women’s science identities in STEM Ph.D. programs

Authors

Katalin Szelényi
Kate Bresonis
Matthew M. Mars
This article explores the science identities of 21 women STEM Ph.D. students at three research universities in the United States. Following a narrative approach, the findings depict five salient science identities, including those of a) academic, b) entrepreneurial, c) industrial, and d) policy scientist and e) scientist as community educator. Our study links the five science identities to epistemological approaches in knowledge creation and application and describes the ways in which women STEM doctoral students verified their identities in reaction to various social structures. Conclusions relate to concepts of identity confirmation, suppression, and flexibility to implications for policy and practice. [Graduate Student] Szelényi, Katalin, Kate Bresonis & Matthew M. Mars (2016). Who am I versus who can I become? Exploring women’s science identities in STEM Ph.D. programs. Review of Higher Education, 40(1), 1-31. doi: 10.1353/rhe.2016.0036

Additional Information

Date of publication:
2016